Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Boho home decor for outer-space nerds

Are you one of those boho lads or lasses with their eyes always on the stars? (I’m talkin’ outer space, not Hollywood.) Then wherever you plant your feet deserves some home décor that sends you over the moon (metaphorically speaking).

If you’re the competitive type, prove your prowess by taking these quizzes:

If you aced those, try Clickhole's “Are You an Astronomy Nerd?” to get Planet Big Head back down to size. Or, secure in your knowledge, move directly on to today’s boho home décor inspiration and ideas. We’ll take it planet by planet. Er, uh...I mean room by room.


First up, add space to your living.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Dot & Bo

Outer space decor, that is, not square footage. This living room gets its romantic night sky from the Sky Dreams Mural. It’s available in four, six or eight panels, depending on the overall size of your wall (93-186 inches) and starts at $299.

If you’re not into something quite so permanent (or sticky), check out these…

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
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Make your home office a custom cosmos condo.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Apparatus via Lonny

The Arrow by Apparatus pendants look like constellations, or even a space station, to me. Here, a small and large size hang together for double the intergalactic wallop. Both sizes can be purchased hand-wrapped in matte python, as the smaller one is above, or calfskin. Prices start at $3,150.

But the chandelier isn’t the only galactically gorgeous idea in this photo. How ‘bout that marble slab desk set on two stone polyhedrons? Nothing like natural stone to conjure up the landscapes of Mars and our very own moon. The almost black wall and shelf color does the rest, suggesting a night sky full of opportunities for exploration.

Here are a few other, other-worldly decorating opportunities for your work pod:



BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
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In case you couldn't read the cosmic art on the desk note holder or that space-tacular pillow, here are larger versions:

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan


Extra doodads—particularly in the office—help turn work to play. These, in particular, fire my rockets…

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
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Celestial décor is a natural for the bedroom.


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Via Theme Rooms Blogspot

This room ensures sweet dreams with its midnight blue walls, woodwork and doors, accented with customized cloud, moon and star effects. If you don’t have a steady hand (I definitely do not), look for a decal or stencil kit to achieve similar results.

Or book a room at the Hotel du Petit Moulin in Paris (my personal favorite)…

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Via Trip Advisor

You'll have sweet dreams under a full moon and a shooting star, no matter the time of year. And with the right company, maybe even some fireworks? Oui, s’il vous plait!

After re-entry, turn your own bed and bath into an outlandish outer-space spa with dreamy astronomic add-ons…

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And it wouldn’t be a true space place without some astronomic art, right?


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
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Follow my affiliate link to Dot & Bo and scroll down to “Moonstruck Modern Interiors” for more out-of-this-world ideas for your home-sweet-home on planet earth. And if you'd also follow my blog with Bloglovin, I'd be over the moon! (Figuratively speaking, of course)

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Boho brights energize open-concept home

I like my kitchens sleek, modern and uber-functional—same way I like my men—but you seldom see me get excited over one from a magazine or designer's portfolio (kitchen or man!). 

I'm even LESS likely to feature a kitchen on BoHo Home. That is, until I collided with this one, and man, did it ever get my boho-baby motor purring.

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

Actually, it's more than a mere kitchen. It's a combination kitchen, living room and dining room. On the must list when the Consiglio family designed the space for their Greensboro, NC, new build:
  • An open layout that allowed mom Amy to see clear through to the living room 
  • A big island 
  • Restaurant-quality features, like a powerful hood to whoosh away cooking odors
“Food is like a sport for us,” says Amy Consiglio. “We love prepping, cooking, and eating—we even hold little competitions—so we knew we had to get the kitchen right and build the rest of the house around it.”

Smart woman, that Amy. If you like to cook and you’ve ever lived in an open-layout home with a builder’s grade range hood (I have), you’ll understand what she’s saying. All those cooking vapors travel and build up over time on your upholstery, walls, light fixtures—you name it. A properly rated hood/fan for the space, vented to the outdoors, makes a monumental difference. It's not a sexy buy, but it's money well-spent.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

Amy's hood is sleek, modern and unobtrusive (another good quality for a man!), but it's what's under the hood, literally, that counts the most. Meaning the fan, but okay, now that we're on the subject, it's the same for the man, too!


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

Amy teamed up with designer Jessica Dauray to help her focus her ideas for the space, and together they piled on patterns. “The trick is that we stuck with three main colors: chartreuse, teal and white,” Amy explains. “The mix keeps your eye moving around the space so it always feels high-energy in here.” The gray-and-white striped rug ups the energy while remaining neutral colorwise and is easy-care polypropylene.

When Amy couldn’t find a large enough print for the ottoman, she designed one herself and had it printed on spoonflower.com. To me, that dreamsicle orange around the sides makes the room. Ordinarily I’m not a fan of white sofas, but this one is Sunbrella fabric, which makes it extra stain-resistant. And if that range hood is doing its job, the furniture has nothing to fear. 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

The glass tile for the backsplash inspired the room’s signature chartreuse. Husband Brian discovered the neon pendants at the last minute, and “they make the room,” says Amy. Each one weighs more than 100 pounds and required special reinforcement. 

The 12-foot island with quartz counter provides plenty of room for all those food competitions and for working on school projects. “We thought the kitchen table and banquette would be our gathering place,” Amy adds. “But honestly, everyone’s always at the island. It’s our favorite place for coffee, parties, and doing homework.” 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

That’s okay. More room for me on the banquette, which I am seriously drooling over. That Jonathan Alder for Kravet fabric on the back is called “Pots,” and I adore its midcentury modern vibe, as well as the mix of greens with gray and teal. The ottoman seems to repeat its shapes, and together they unify the space. 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

The coffered, 10-foot ceiling adds character to the living room, but it’s the inset color—Sherwin Williams Frolic—that makes the space so cozy, IMHO. “I couldn’t stand white every which way,” Amy says, and I agree.

“When I met Amy and Brian, I knew this was not going to be a beige house,” Dauray says. All I can say is, Who wants beige when you can have this? It makes me happy just drooling over it.

I. Am. Agog. 

No small feat. Really.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
David Land

Good thing this feature is online at the HGTV website because my copy has drool rings all over these pages. Especially this page. 

Read the full story here, or pick up a copy of the May 2016 HGTV Magazine before it sells out for a complete source list and a mood board. And while you're clickin' and grinnin', follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

On FLEEK: Met 'Fashion in an Age of Technology' design remix

This home décor junkie can’t help but look at a museum exhibit without thinking how featured artifacts translate to home decor. I guess it's just the boho in my soul. Architectural Digest ran an interesting photo feature about this year’s costume institute exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York—“Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology”—that got my wheels turning once again.

The exhibit explores how designers reconcile the handmade versus the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and still preserve its bespoke nature. The AD feature caught my eye because it pairs up some of the creations on exhibit with counterparts in building architecture. I immediately started puzzling over how to connect the design features of each with interiors, and here’s what I came up with—seven trends that span the larger design spectrum.


1. Layers of bright color


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Nicholas Alan Cope via The Met/Victoria Murillo via Getty

The pleated folds of Issey Miyake’s “Flying Saucer Dress” look at home next to Canadian architect Frank Gehry’s boho-colored Biomuseo in Panama City. After an effusive fall focus on pastels, dominated by Pantone colors of the year selections for 2016, the fashion runways earlier this year started showing more bright colors again. Boho babe that I am, my home’s décor never made the leap to pastels. I just gotta have color—lots of it, saturated and bright.

Like in this space…

A good match, yes? 

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan


2. Nature-inspired bursts


George Pimentel via Getty/Getty

Maiko Takeda’s shimmering, fringed headpiece is constructed of acetate, while the spiny façade of Thomas Heatherwick’s UK Pavilion for the Shanghai World Expo is composed of 60,000 clear acrylic rods. Both echo the trend in home décor toward dandelion seedheads (booms), sunbursts, starbursts, and spiny sea urchins, which reprise midcentury modern designs. (See On Fleek: It’s da boom!, Sept.3, 2015.)


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Source unknow/Harry Bertoia/Lauren Santo Domingo via Vogue

The shape has found its way into sculpture and lighting for homes and commercial spaces. I have three of these in silver myself, hanging above a painting in my living room, plus a smaller one as part of a grouping in my dining area. They never fail to catch the attention and admiration of visitors...


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan

...and dust. They catch a lot of dust too.


3. Organic matrix or web


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George Pimentel via Getty/Dan Mullan via Getty

A 3D printer produced the web-like flourishes on these dresses by Noa Raviv, yet  they share a matrix—or webbed—structure with the Heydar Aliyev Center in Baku, Azerbaijan, designed by Zaha Hadid.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Contemporary Tiles/Miguel de Guzman via Imagen Subliminal

This trend is perhaps most apparent in tile design, where geometrics are all the rage, but also in the angled, undulating interior walls shown at right. See On FLEEK—“The Shape of Design to Come,” March 8, 2016—for variations in furniture design and finish and a plethora of home accessories that build on the popularity of this trend. The tile pictured—interestingly called “Dandelion” for its web-like patterning within each hexagonal piece—is by Swedish maker Contemporary Tiles, while the room at right was designed by PYO Arquitectos.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan

These three look in perfect harmony to me, and that pooch looks especially happy! ;->


4. Fish scales


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The Met/Romana Lilic via Getty

Nature has always been a big influencer of design, as this 1983 dress by Yves Saint Laurent, attests. It bears a striking resemblance to the iridescent fish-scale exterior of the Museo Soumaya in Mexico City, designed by Fernando Romero, nearly 30 years later. The dress was hand-embroidered with sequins and beads to achieve the fish-scale effect, while the Museo Soumaya gets its gleam from 16,000 hexagonal pieces of mirrored steel, which makes this trend a bit of a crossover with #3.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Mercury Mosaics

Like the matrix trend in #3, the fish-scale look in home décor perhaps finds its best expression in tile. The “undersea” look is big in bathrooms, but I like the singularity of its use in this kitchen. With clean-lined modern cabinets, matching window molding and no window coverings, the tile becomes the focal point without detracting from the view out the windows. Fussier cabinets and windows and the tile would only look busy.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan

Très copacetic, oui?


5. Laser lace


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Slaven Vlasic via Getty/Fush + Partners Architects

Lasers cut the leather lace for this dress created by Marc Jacobs for Louis Vuitton. The designs on the façade of El Blok, a hotel in Vieques, an island east of Puerto Rico, were molded in concrete, but the look is similar. Although the effect is much more subtle on the dress, lacy cutouts play with shadow and light. In the dress they add dimension, while in the building they make interesting viewing within as the angle of the sun changes throughout the day. 

Laser-cut metal and wood installations are also finding their ways onto the outsides of residential buildings. Check out this home in Long Island, NY, designed by aamodt/plumb architects for a spectacular example of laser lace in home décor that connects outside and inside…

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
aamodt/plumb architects via Houzz

This house is blessed with water views on both the north and south sides, but east and west sides face neighbors. The architect used laser-cut screens to provide privacy for the house’s glass walls:
  • (A) You barely see the screen from this view, but it’s installed perpendicular to the front door. 
  • (B) This is a close-up of the screen near the entryway. The floral-like pattern adds an art nouveau flourish to the home’s modern, minimalist exterior. 
  • (C) When the sun is in the east, patterns saturate the entry space. 
  • (D) The most dramatic effect is created inside the home when the sunlight hits the screens and paints the same floral patterns in light on interior wood surfaces. 
  • (E) The house's floor plan is basically a square with a narrow rectangular light well cut into the center. Screens also cover the ends of the light well, allowing the dappled light to refract through the glass walls and, in this view, the stair's glass guardrails. 
  • (F) This final view looks into the light well from in front of a screen. With their location on east and west facades, the screens act like a sundial, tracking the sun in its arc across the sky.
Take a closer look at this home on Houzz.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan

LEFT: Scandinavian Birch Plywood Fly Chandelier, handmade in the Ukraine, sold on Etsy, $120. CENTER: Parametric Laser-Cut Large Coral Clock, Asymmetree.com, $167. RIGHT: Silver Tangle Light by Tord Boontie, sold on Fab.com, $105.

Laser-cut home décor accessories are popular for the same reasons, although on a scale smaller still. The two laser-cut chandeliers shown here cast interesting patterns when illuminated, while other home accessories, like the clock, play with shadow and reflected light from other light sources in a room. Items like these are fabricated from materials such as wood, metal, and plastics.
 

BoHoHome.com @bohosusan


6. Origami folds


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
George Pimentel/Aedas

One could say Pierre Cardin was prescient when he fabricated these dresses in 1968, which were heat-molded to resemble the crisp folds of origami paper art. Only much later—2015—did the Al Bahr Towers in Abu Dhabi, UAE, appear, designed by Junya Watanabe and built by Aedas. The twin glass-and-steel towers have Teflon-coated window coverings that react to the sun, opening and closing throughout the day to reduce energy use. 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Aljoud Lootah

Geometry is everywhere in home décor accessories these days, so it was a little tricky to pick out something from the legions that captured the look of origami. This origami-inspired furniture by Aljoud Lootah, a Dubai-based product designer, debuted at Design Days Dubai earlier this year. The Oru Series, as it’s called, takes its name from the Japanese for “to fold.” Each piece of furniture is fabricated from a flat sheet of material, which is then folded into a three-dimensional product. Striking, don’t you think? You can take a closer look at each piece at Feel Desain Online Magazine. You can also follow Aljoud Lootah Design Studio on Instagram. 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan

The dresses and the towers are softer somehow than the furniture—rounded overall in spite of the angular parts. But I also love the sleek, minimalist silhouettes of the Lootah pieces. They would make incredible accents in any modern-minded home.


7. Skeletons


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
The Met/Getty

Iris van Herpen's first 3D-printed garment, with its accordion layered top, resembles the striated white sides of the Soho Complex in Beijing, designed by Zaha Hadid. Both suggest a skeletal structure, rib cages to be precise. And I can also see in the top of the dress a human skull—or maybe it’s one of the aliens captured near Roswell. I can’t tell which. ANYWAY, bones and body parts are big in home décor these days, too. 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Via Porch.com

From the human skulls that aren’t just for Halloween anymore—I defy you to find a chic Manhattan loft without at least one in white or gold ceramic—to…


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Restoration Hardware

…animal skulls and antlers. It’s the “curiosity shop” trend in home décor that has seen a resurgence in the sale of wooden artist models and vintage glove forms. The latter are reproduced more cheaply in ceramics and resins, as are the animal skulls. I think the glove forms and wooden artist models look quite striking in a vignette, and antlers also are very cool. But I draw the line at skulls. Not my cup of bones. 


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan

I don’t mind other people examining my home décor vignettes with interest. I just don’t want the vignettes staring back.


More about the exhibit that inspired this post...


Manus x Machina is scheduled to close Aug. 14, so if you’re going to be in the NYC area this summer, you won’t want to miss it. Follow the link for more information, including videos that bring portions of the exhibit to life for those who can’t attend. 

Follow this link to purchase the limited edition catalog of the exhibit for $295, this link to browse exhibit-related products, and this one to follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Historic Boston townhome stacks up modern art, boho-style

This art-filled Boston townhome is the opposite of an austere white-walled art gallery, which means its décor rocks and rolls with color and light from floor to wall to ceiling. Marni and Damon Katz have been enthusiastic art buyers for 20-plus years, but their attitude toward decorating their home with art is anything but stuffy. “We just buy what we like and figure we’ll find a place for it,” Marni says.

And so far, it's worked. The 2,600-square-foot condo they’ve lived in since 2003 cooperates by providing ample room for display. And even though the historic brownstone was built in 1885, inside it’s most definitely 2016, with bright boho colors and textures dominating the home's decor as well as the largely modern, and perpetually growing, collection of paintings, photos and prints.


http://www.annieschlechter.com/
Annie Schlechter

In the family room, Marni broke some hard-and-fast gallery-wall rules (boho, right?) by mixing up the frames on every piece in the grouping over the sofa. The bright pillows and area rug pick up the colors of the art, rather than compete with it. A charcoal gray sofa (my go-to fave), light greige walls (Benjamin Moore Valley Forge Tan), and a nubby gray area rug layered under the more colorful one are the perfect backdrop for high boho drama.


http://www.annieschlechter.com/
Annie Schlechter

The kitchen is smack dab in the middle of the condo, so Marni decided to paint the inset ceiling a different color (Benjamin Moore Warm Springs) to brighten and define the area. “A blue ceiling makes me feel like I’m outdoors even when I’m doing the dishes,” she adds. 

Notice the tiny “surprise” art by the refrigerator, framed in can’t-miss-it chartreuse.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

The family of four eats most of their meals in the breakfast nook. Banquettes always look cozy to me, but this one is made even cozier by the art that surrounds it. Notice how some has been hung below eye-level, so it can be enjoyed by someone who’s seated. Again Marni mixes up her frames, but she breaks another rule as well: the art is hung without any theme in mind. “I put up one piece I liked,” she says, “the photo of the girl in the grass (black frame, left), then built around it.”

I like her confidence. It gives me the push I need to start hanging some of the art I bought for my own gallery walls.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

A three-dimensional wool rug from Angela Adams determined the palette in this not-so-formal, formal living room. “I love the rug’s lush, storybook forest feel,” Marni says. Paintings in the room reinforce that feeling, as does the wall color (Benjamin Moore Pale Vista). 

Notice, too, how Marni makes use of every nook and cranny to hang art—the bay window’s wide molding gets a dose, as does the short wall (right) over the built-in-storage units. The effect? No matter where you stand or what angle you look from, there's eye candy. Yumm!!


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

Even the nonfunctioning fireplace is put to work with one canvas above and another complimentary one leaned against the opening. “Propping up art is a low commitment,” she says. “I can change it on a whim—no nails!” The painting-as-screen does double duty by blocking drafts.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

The stairwell is at a direct sight line from the kitchen. And since Marni spends a lot of time in her kitchen, she dressed the stairwell with some of her favorite pieces. I like how the gentle curve of the pendant light softens the hard edges of the framed art.

I also like that handsome ginger tabby cat making an entrance! That would be the most highly treasured work of art in MY book.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

Marni continued the Pale Vista paint color from the living room into the master bedroom, which is down those stairs you just saw and on the bottom level of the five-storey condo. She then chose summery green bedding and wallpaper in white and silver to help bounce light around. 

So who says now you can’t hang art against wallpaper? One more home decor “rule” out the window!


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

One of the boys' rooms even proves you can locate bold art next to a bold patterned textile. The lithograph shown here shares similar shapes and colors with the headboard, and it all looks great against Benjamin Moore Blue Hydrangea. I love the delicate dance of dots and lines in this room, and ikat anything always gets my vote.


BoHoHome.com @bohosusan
Annie Schlechter

The Katz condo is in Boston’s historic Back Bay neighborhood. Follow the link to read more about their home. Or pick up a copy of the latest issue of HGTV Magazine and get Marni’s go-to list of click-to-buy art, all priced under $100. And, while you’re clicking around, I’d be tickled if you also used this link to follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Way to go BOHO/5: Unique textile mix brings boho style home


BoHo Home @bohosusan
Tim Street-Porter via One Kings Lane

You can get this boho look in your home for a lot less than you might think. Boho style packs a lot of wham into each decor buck you send its way because it often relies on a mix of ethnic textiles that, thanks to the Internet, are readily available at many price points.


Take the wall tapestry in this room, for instance.


A wall hanging can be used in place of a headboard in a bedroom, but if you look at the photo closely you'll see there's also a headboard in this room. The tapestry has just been neatly tucked behind it, then lapped over it to change out the look.

While the textile used in the inspiration photo may indeed be a hand-embellished, one-of-a-kind item, you can get a similar look for pennies on the dollar. For instance...

BoHo Home @bohosusan

...this lotus pattern "tapestry" sells on Amazon for $19.95. It's described as "tapestry, tablecloth, beach sheet, wall art," and I would add "bedspread/coverlet" to that. Its design is printed on cotton, but hey, you're hanging it on the wall, remember? It won't be viewed close-up unless your guests climb across the bed on their knees to get their noses in it. And if they're like me, they're too old for that sort of thing.

Who cares anyway? Its purpose is to provide a splash of brilliant color and arresting pattern that can be seen from even a distance - down a hallway through an open door, but, at the least, each time you walk into your bedroom. The bed is typically the focal point in any bedroom, and this inexpensive piece of cloth helps make your bed look impressive so you can spend your money elsewhere.

See how well it emulates the look of the inspiration room:


BoHo Home @bohosusan

I can't promise all aspects of this room how-to redo are as much of a bargain as the wall-hanging, but I will say that it all depends on what you can do with what you already have and how determined of a shopper you are.


Let's look at those nightstands next.


BoHo Home @bohosusan

Matching campaign-style nightstand-sized chests aren't easy to find, and you'll notice the ones I used in the mood board are navy blue with brass hardware rather than charcoal gray with chrome hardware. I actually like them better than the gray ones, but that's me.

I found them in a children's store, where they were being sold as changing tables, so the height was adult-size.


BoHo Home @bohosusan
Land of Nod

They weren't inexpensive, but they weren't terribly expensive either at $699 each. Campaign style stands the test of time and mixes with traditional or modern, so consider it a wise investment.

Or...

BoHo Home @bohosusan
Turquoise & Gold

Refurbish a small chest you already own or an inexpensive new chest to emulate the campaign style. The Internet is full of IKEA hacks and almost as many IKEA campaign chest hacks. This is a hack of IKEA's popular Rast Chest ($35), and you'll find the DIY on Turquoise & Gold. You'll invest some coin in the hardware, but it likely won't come anywhere near the price of the Land of Nod chests.

What would I do? I'd buy them ready made because I'm getting older and I'm not so into DIY anymore. I've done my share of projects, though, and now I'm paying myself back.


How 'bout those lamps?


BoHo Home @bohosusan

They are gorgeous. Definitely killer, and that's how I know an interior designer put this room together - because I couldn't find anything remotely similar out there. And those designers know of all sorts of sources us regular folks don't. 


BoHo Home @bohosusan
Pottery Barn/CB2

After an exhausting (notice I didn't say exhaustive) Internet search, I narrowed it to these two lamps. Initially I put the lamp on the left into the mood board because of its beautiful hammered detail. But by the time I finished the collage, I didn't like the lamp anymore. Its shape was too ordinary to stand up to the bold pattern in the rest of the room accessories, so I went back to the lamp on the right. 

Both lamps are pricey - $230 for the Pottery Barn Nori Lamp I rejected and $349 for the CB2 Lola Lamp I chose instead. Lola is a big girl - 34.5 inches compared to Nori's 27.5 - and big is what this room called for. Between Home Goods, Tuesday Morning, Internet sales, and vintage/thrift shops, you're bound to find a pair to fit your budget and your space.

If you're someone who buys a lamp and keeps it forever, then $349 for a good lamp is a sound investment. But a lamp's days are numbered in my house if it's been around longer than five years. I tend to look for good buys so I don't have to feel guilty when I change them out.


Kilim pillows are everywhere these days, so shop around.


Just about every major department and home furnishings store has a line of kilims these days, and you can find them on Etsy as well as other Internet sites. The department store ones are mass-produced, of course. And you can certainly find one-of-a-kind ones on the Internet for the same or less than what you might pay for mass-produced. Just be sure to factor in the shipping.


Here's our mood board again, this time with links to products.


BoHo Home @bohosusan
| 1. Flower of Life Tapestry by Zest for Life, Amazon, $20 | 2. Lola Table Lamp by Lenny Kravitz for CB2, $349 | 3. Campaign Three-Drawer Chest in Midnight Blue, Land of Nod, $699 each | 4. Urban Trends Ceramic Sitting Buddha Figurine, Walmart, $42 | 5. House of Hampton Hydrangea Bouquet in Mercury Glass Vase, Wayfair, $130 | 6. Leonora Grand Sham, Frontgate, $215 | 7. Red Kilim Lumbar Pillow Cover, Etsy, $22 | 8. Charcoal Kilim Pillow Cover, Etsy, $45| 9. Turkish Boho Kilim Pillow Cover, ebay, $22 | 10. Pick-Stitch Quilt in Flagstone, Pottery Barn, $179 | 11. Handira Tamizart Moroccan Wedding Blanket, Essence of Morocco Ltd., $350.|

A different kind of textile that's a little easier on the pocketbook could work at the foot of the bed. Look for kilim throws and even lightweight rugs. And here's a DIY I know I'd still do: that beige linen body pillow. Anyone can make a pillow. Really. 

I have to say this was the easiest room I've sourced in this series, which tells me the look is easy to achieve in any home. Once again: Way to go, BOHO!

With that thought, I'll leave you to your shopping. And don't forget to follow my blog with Bloglovin.





  

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